My Present Past
A genealogical experience
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Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad
Construction for the year 1881 aggregated nearly 257 miles, comprising an extension of the
Marion &  McPherson branch from Lyons to Ellinwood, about 20 miles ; the Florence, El Dorado and Walnut
Valley extended from El Dorado to Douglass, 24 miles, and the Harvey County railroad, Sedgwick to
Halstead, Kansas, 9 miles in length. These branches were completed to the points named on September 1st,
August 1st, and December 31st, respectively. In addition there were the lines in the Southwest already
described : the
Rio Grande, Mexico & Pacific from San Marcial to Deming, and Rincon to the Texas boundary;
the
Rio Grande & El Paso Railroad in Texas from the New Mexico line, 20 miles to El Paso; the New Mexico and
Arizona of which about 18 miles were finished in 1881 and a short spur of about 7 miles from Raton to the coal
mines at Dillon in northern New Mexico.

The following year, 1882, about 124 miles were added. This increase included a 14-mile track from Olathe to
connect the
Southern Kansas system with the main line at Holliday, with the remainder in New Mexico and
Arizona. Also in the summer of 1882 the Santa Fe purchased a controlling interest in the
Leavenworth, Topeka
& Southwestern, commonly known as the "Leavenworth & Topeka," a line about 46 miles in length running from
Meriden to Leavenworth, Kansas. At the end of 1882 the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe system comprised 2,620
miles of railroad, located in Missouri, Kansas, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, Arizona and Sonora, Mexico. The
total earnings were over $14,770,000 an increase of nearly $2,200,000 over the preceding year. The net
earnings were more than $6,000,000 of which the Southern Kansas produced over $600,000. The Company
now represented a permanent investment of more than $82,000,000 in stocks and bonds and was in an
excellent financial condition with no floating debts. To handle the growing traffic of the road 97 locomotives
and 611 cars were added to the Santa Fe's equipment that year. In his annual report for 1882, President
Strong said: "Thirteen years ago the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railroad, a line then 28 miles in length under
the same general direction which now governs its affairs, asked the confidence and support of the
Massachusetts public in the execution of the projects it contemplated. Through good and evil times that
support has always been readily given and that confidence has never been broken ; and as a result those who
have followed the fortunes of the company have shared in its prosperity." What the future plans of the company
might be, Strong said must largely depend upon the policy pursued by the road's competitors. He assured the
stockholders that every prudent measure would be taken "to preserve the property in its integrity." It is
doubtless quite apparent by this time that Strong's methods of preserving the integrity of his company's
property was that of vigorous expansion and while wonderful progress had been made in thirteen years, the
railroad was as yet only started upon its future great development.
During this period in 1881 my great grandparents, Edward and Sadie Engel were searching for a new beginning.
The background of this page displays the check tickets used during this time. The History of the Santa Fe will
continue in the following pages.

However, the story of Edward and Sadie with the Santa Fe begins in
Emporia, Kansas in the Summer of 1881.
At the end of 1882 the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe system comprised 2,620 miles of railroad, located in
Missouri, Kansas, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, Arizona and Sonora, Mexico. The total earnings were over the
preceding year. The net earnings were more than $6,000,000 of which the Southern Kansas produced over
$600,000. The Company now represented a permanent investment of more than $82,000,000 in stocks and
bonds and was in an excellent financial condition with no floating debts. To handle the growing traffic of the
road 97 locomotives and 611 cars were added to the Santa Fe's equipment that year.
In July, 1883, the Ottawa and Burlington, extending 46 miles from near Ottawa to Burlington, a road
incorporated on February 4th, 1870, as the
Kansas City, Burlington & Santa Fe and opened for traffic March
28th, 1878, was consolidated with the Southern Kansas system. In 1883-84 several branches were added to
the
Southern Kansas railroad as follows: By the Kansas City & Emporia company, chartered December 11th,
1880, from
Ottawa to Emporia, 56 miles, opened February 1st, 1884. This road connected the Southern Kansas
system with the Santa Fe main line at
Emporia and is today (1920) a part of the double-tracked through main
line from Kansas City to Emporia. Other construction during this period was by the Kansas Southern, chartered
February 15th, 1884, from
Chanute to Girard, about 40 miles and opened at the end of that year; and by the
Harper & Western, chartered July 1st, 1884, from
Harper to Attica, nearly 12 miles, and opened November
10th, 1884. The
Girard branch tapped the best coal fields in Kansas and has since become one of the most
valuable feeders in the Santa Fe system; while the
Harper branch was soon to be extended into a main line.
These branches so interwove the Southern Kansas lines with those of the Santa Fe company that in 1884 the
accounts of the two systems were amalgamated and the Southern Kansas henceforth became in reality only a
corporate name to designate a certain group of Santa Fe lines. During this same year the Atchison management
purchased, likewise through the
Kansas City, Topeka & Western, a half interest in the Kansas City Belt Line
railway, which was made necessary by the heavy growth of business and the need of better terminal facilities
in Kansas City. The Belt Line was constructed in 1885-86 and proved a valuable asset to the company. Other
construction finished during this period was the
Wichita & Western, from Wichita to Kingman, about 45 miles,
constructed jointly by the Atchison and the
St. Louis & San Francisco companies; and the Lake Valley,
Magdalena and Silver City branches in New Mexico. About 250 miles were added by purchase or construction in
Kansas and New Mexico in the years 1883 and 1884. The long expected entrance of California was now at hand.
With the completion on July 29th, 1884, of a large and permanent bridge over the Colorado river at Needles,
California, through passenger trains with sleeping car service were at once established without charge or
transfer between San Francisco and Kansas City. Yet a serious dilemma now confronted the Atchison Topeka &
Santa Fe, for there was little or no traffic for the
Atlantic & Pacific road. Extending for hundreds of miles
through a wholly undeveloped country, much of it desert waste, local business could not be expected until
mineral deposits and occasional tracts of timber could be exploited. While a large amount of through traffic
should have been passing over this line it is claimed that the Southern Pacific persistently diverted such
traffic over its central and southern routes through Ogden and El Paso. In building the Atlantic & Pacific
through to the Needles title had been secured to some 14,000,000 acres of land worth on the average about
fifty cents per acre. The St Louis & San Francisco was again free from Southern Pacific influence and ready to
act on its own initiative. Some definite plan must be determined in order to relieve this situation and in the
summer of 1884 several courses of procedure were open. One was to do nothing. The Santa Fe & Frisco
companies might continue to endure the existing situation and keep the Atlantic & Pacific company solvent by
their pocketing a heavy loss on the money already invested. In that case they would submit to a fixed charges
of at least $1,000,000 per year of which each company must furnish half for an indefinite time without
prospect of any proportionate financial returns. Another alternative was to abandon the Atlantic & Pacific and
renounce, perhaps forever, the prospect of getting into California. For W. B. Strong and the Atchison
directorate this idea was repugnant, since they were determined to gain a foothold in California. Such a plan,
furthermore, would allow the Atlantic & Pacific to become insolvent and inflict heavy loss upon security holders
who had advanced money to aid the enterprise, with the understanding that the road would be built and
maintained. In such event, the Southern Pacific would naturally gain instant possession of the abandoned road
and thereby perhaps invade Atchison territory in Mew Mexico, Colorado and Kansas.
A third and boldly aggressive proposition was to parallel the Southern Pacific by constructing an entirely new
line more than 600 miles from Needles to San Francisco. While physically possible such a project seemed at
that time unwise, because of the great expense not only in building the road but in securing terminals in the
metropolis. Evidently fearing that W. B. Strong might do this, however, Huntington, of the St Louis & San
Francisco, came forward with another compromise. This time he offered to sell the so-called Mojave Division
which his company had built from Mojave to Needles to connect with the Atlantic & Pacific the year before. The
two companies agreed and the purchase of the Mojave line by the Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe was tendered
with four written conditions that were ratified by all three lines, the Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe, the St.
Louis & San Francisco and the Southern Pacific, on August 20th, 1884.
The Atlantic & Pacific Company bought the Southern Pacific road between Mojave and Needles, 242 miles for
$30,000 per mile. The road, however could not be discharged due to a Southern Pacific mortgage not due until
1905. The line was to be leased to the Atlantic & Pacific at a yearly rental equal to 6% of the purchase price.
When title could be given, payment was to be made, one sixth in cash and the remainder in cash or in Atlantic &
Pacific first mortgage bonds, the bonds and rental guaranteed jointly by the Atchison & Frisco companies.

The Atlantic & Pacific secured trackage and traffic right between Mojave and San Francisco Bay, together
with terminal facilities in Oakland and San Francisco. Paying an annual rental of $1200 per mile between Mojave
and San Francisco.

The Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe and St. Louis & San Francisco companies acquire the Pacific Improvement
Company's Atlantic & Pacific securities of $3,096,768 par value, but at the real cost of $1,524,356.46, which
was the actual selling price. The Pacific Improvement Company was a subsidiary of the Southern Pacific and had
organized the building of the Mojave division and through the parent company, the Southern Pacific, had bought
Atlantic & Pacific stocks and bonds worth at par $3,096,768 but at an actual selling price of $1,524,356.46.
Hence as a partial offset for these concessions, Huntington unloaded a batch of undesirable railroad securities
upon the Santa Fe and Frisco companies.

The last agreement was to amend the tripartite agreement of 1880
(see page 11) by explaining clauses of
doubtful meaning and adding others, so adapting the agreement to an altered state of facts as to carry out its
object and original intent and purpose.

These arrangements became operative on October 01, 1884, with the Mojave Division taken over by the
Atlantic & Pacific, whence it was to become an integral part of the Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe system.