The area around what is now Green Mountain Falls was ranched by George Howard in 1881. He and his friend
Ogden Whitlock built the first house there. In 1887, W.J. Foster bought the valley in order to build a summer
resort. In 1888, the lake was excavated, the island and gazebo were built, the streets were laid out, and about
100 tent cabins were constructed on the hillsides. Hundreds of guests rented tent cabins each summer. The
Green Mountain Falls Hotel and the Lakeside Hotel opened in 1889. The Colorado Midland depot beside the lake
brought visitors from across the country to relax in the cool mountain valley. In 1890, Green Mountain Falls was
incorporated as a town. By 1900, the town had several hotels, a train station, three grocery stores, a church,
school, newspaper, an icehouse, blacksmith shop, and other businesses. A fire department was created in 1908
after the Green Mountain Falls Hotel burned. Ice cutting and ranching were also important enterprises in early
Green Mountain Falls. The Brockhurst Ranch was run by Henry Brockhurst, who lived there most of his life. His
grandmother came from Scotland to homestead the ranch in 1887. Henry and his wife, LuLu, began dude
ranching in 1936. The Brockhursts donated the ranch to the Woodland Park Lions Club to become a home for
emotionally disturbed boys in 1962.
My Present Past
A genealogical experience
Click on an image to view full size
Ute Pass
In 1872 Ute Pass Park was built under the leadership of William Henry Blackmore, who had originally purchased
about one thousand acres of land that surrounded the valley of the area. With this sizeable purchase of land,
this opened up the area to European investors, who would develop the towns of Colorado Springs and Manitou.
Ute Park was located on the
Colorado Midland Railway which had a 27 mile line on Ute Pass from Colorado
Springs to Divide.  The town grew quickly and included Sales Sawmill which cut trees from Bald Mountain and
Manitou Park
. With the death of William Blackmore in 1879, the land was sold and used for ranches, farming
and lumber. In 1890, the Ute Pass Land and Water Company was incorporated and the town once again thrived
with the focus of building a resort town. Homes and cottages were constructed along with the Ute Hotel and a
red sandstone Colorado Midland depot. On New Years Eve of 1899 the hotel caught fire and burned to the
ground, which facilitated the closing of the depot, which was later torn down. After the fire, the town went

into decline. In 1927 Frank Marcroft bought the Ute Pass Land and Water Company and began to develop the
area into a resort once again. Renaming the town Chipita Park, after the wife of Chief Ouray of the Ute

Indians, he built the Chipita Park Lodge, a nine hole golf course, riding stables, tennis courts and a well stocked
lake, which helped bring the community back to life. Marcroft promoted the community on many trips to the
eastern states, inviting people to visit or build summer homes in the cool mountains.
After Marcroft died in 1941, the Chipita Park area became mostly residential again.
The area around what is now Green Mountain Falls was ranched by George Howard in 1881. He and his friend
Ogden Whitlock built the first house there. In 1887, W.J. Foster bought the valley in order to build a summer
resort. In 1888, the lake was excavated, the island and gazebo were built, the streets were laid out, and about
100 tent cabins were constructed on the hillsides. Hundreds of guests rented tent cabins each summer. The
Green Mountain Falls Hotel and the Lakeside Hotel opened in 1889. The Colorado Midland depot beside the lake
brought visitors from across the country to relax in the cool mountain valley. In 1890, Green Mountain Falls

was incorporated as a town. By 1900, the town had several hotels, a train station, three grocery stores, a
church, school, newspaper, an ice house, blacksmith shop, and other businesses. A fire department was created
in 1908 after the Green Mountain Falls Hotel burned. Ice cutting and ranching were also important enterprises
in early Green Mountain Falls. The Brockhurst Ranch was run by
Henry Brockhurst, who lived there most of his
life. His grandmother came from Scotland to homestead the ranch in 1887. Henry and his wife, LuLu, began
dude ranching in 1936. The Brockhurst's donated the ranch to the Woodland Park Lions Club to become a home
for emotionally disturbed boys in 1962.
1890 Colorado Cities Pg 30
1890 Colorado Cities Pg 31
1890 Colorado Cities Pg 33
1890 Colorado Cities Pg 32
1890 Colorado Cities Pg 34
Crystola is a small community just east of Woodland Park once known as Trout Park. The early residents there
were cattle ranchers.
Albert Benedict and family claimed the area as their own in the 1860s. George Sharrock,
John Scott and Habbel Talcott moved into the area in the early 1870's and ended the Benedict's sole
possession of the area, although the Benedict's destroyed the Sharrock's home twice before they gave up
harassing the newcomers. In 1873 George Sharrock opened a roadhouse known as the Junction House to serve
the steady stream of travelers through the pass.
The local ranchers shared their section of the pass with a
colony of spiritualists in the 1890s.
Henry Childs, speaker of the Illinois House of Representatives, built a
home there in 1876. He also began to run a small ranch and
lumber mill. He and his wife, Catherine, consulted
their crystal ball regularly and held séances in their home with visiting spiritual mediums.
Henry Childs
founded the Brotherhood Gold Mining and Milling Company in 1897. A number of investors were convinced to
invest large sums of money because of the spiritual readings. In 1899, the company was reorganized as the
Crystola Brotherhood Town, Mine and Milling Company and built an ore-processing mill. The oracles proved
untrue, and the mill was never opened. Although many people searched for gold in Ute Pass and several gold
mining companies were formed, no gold was ever found there. The real wealth for Ute Pass residents was in
the commerce passing to and from the gold and silver mines in Leadville, Aspen, and Cripple Creek.
The Crystola Town Company built a railroad station, grocery store, and post office to accommodate a growing
population of spiritualists. Shares in the community were sold across the country. Soon the town also had a
school and a water system. After Childs died in 1910, he willed that his land should be used to form a school of
spiritualism. The Rev. Hiram Vrooman worked to carry out Childs’ wishes. Reverend Vrooman sponsored summer
lectures, sold lots, and rented camp sites for more than 15 years, but Crystola failed to grow. Eventually, the
hotel, grocery, and post office burned, and the lumber from the mill was used to build a barn.